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Vicky Ball is the Head of Housing for Phoenix Futures, a substance misuse charity and registered provider, residential rehab, housing and criminal justice services (drug services in prisons) community services, 500 staff, England and Scotland.  She graduated the LSBU course recently with a distinction.

We asked her to explain why she did the course and how it has made a difference.

“The housing and homelessness focus of the course was key for me as it is quite unusual. I have done some leadership training in the past but this was the first course I saw that was specific and at a post graduate level.  And of course the finances were persuasive, with LHF paying half the course fees for all students.

As with many people, I had come to a stage in my career where I’ve done a lot of training, a lot of self-study but now needed to refresh and hone my skills, especially as this is my first senior management role.

I found the final module – organisational development – particularly helpful; consolidating my knowledge about how organisations work and how to utilise performance frameworks.  My peers were great, it was a very good cohort and I am sure that is one of the main reasons we did so well.

It is difficult to see exactly what difference it has made yet; as soon as I got my results I went straight into managing the CV-19 impact.  But I am managing to apply things – e.g. reviewing performance management frameworks in my department.

In the end, what I got most was confidence; understanding the reasons why you’re doing the things that you’re doing.  The theories help underpin what we are doing and give you the opportunity to look at the things you are involved in with a fresh perspective.  The course has helped me ground my practice in theory.

I would encourage people to consider the LSBU course; it is genuinely unique and adds real value to the sector.”

For more information about the LHF funded LSBU course go to https://lhf.org.uk/leadership-course/


 

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